Cue mark

Cue dot
A visual indicator located on the upper right-hand corner of a film frame, telling the projectionist to change the reel.

In film prints, a cue mark is a visual indicator located on the upper right-hand corner of a frame.

Cue marks are used as visual signals for the movie projectionist or in television broadcasts. Cue marks are used in pair to signal to the projectionist that a particular reel of a movie is ending; most movies presented on film come to theaters on several reels of film lasting about 14 to 20 minutes each. The marks appear in the last seconds of each reel; the first mark, known as the motor cue, is placed about 8 seconds before the end of the picture section of the reel. The second mark, known as the changeover cue, is placed about 1 second before the end. Each mark lasts for precisely 4 frames (0.17 seconds).

The exact placement of the cue mark on the frame varies somewhat from lab to lab.

Most cue marks appear as either a black circle (if the physical hole is punched out on the negative used to make the projection print of the film) or a white circle (if the mark is made by punching a hole or scraping the emulsion on the positive film print). They will also appear as an oval if the print is projected through an anamorphic lens.

In order to make these marks appear clearer to the projectionist, the punched film is most often "inked" after punching by application of India ink, or a similar ink. The sample frames at the right have very fine inking. In the days of three-strip Technicolor, and successive exposure Technicolor cartoons, where separate silver images were available, it was not uncommon to apply two punches, one being larger and circular and the other being smaller and "serrated", with these being done in contrasting colors.

Coded Anti-Piracy is a different kind of mark, used for watermarking to detect and prevent copyright infringement.

According to SMPTE-301 (Theatre Projection Leader), there shall be 4 frames of the motor cue, followed by 172 frames of the picture, followed by 4 frames of changeover cue, followed by 18 frames of the picture. That puts the motor cue at frames 198–195 from the end of the picture section of the reel (12.34 to 12.15 feet; or 12-foot-6-frames through 12-foot-3-frames), and the changeover cue at frames 21–19 from the end (1.31 to 1.18 feet; or 1-foot-5-frames through 1-foot-3-frames). As of January 2005, most domestic United States release prints follow this standard.

According to SMPTE-55 (SMPTE Universal leader), there shall be 4 frames of the motor cue, followed by 168 frames of the picture, followed by 4 frames of changeover cue, followed by 24 frames of the picture. That puts the motor cue at frames 200–197 (12.47 to 12.28 feet; or 12-foot-8-frames to 12-foot-5-frames) from the end of the picture section of the reel, and the changeover cue at frames 28–25 (1.75 to 1.56 feet; or 1-foot-12-frames to 1-foot-9-frames) from the end. Prior to January 2005, domestic United States release prints printed by Deluxe Laboratories (about half of domestic first-run major releases) followed this standard.

image
Cue mark
also known as
  • Changeover cue
  • Cue blip
  • Cue dot
resources
source
Adapted from content published on wikipedia.org
credit
  • Image By Walter Lantz, Walt Disney, and Universal Pictures - YouTube, PD-US — from wikipedia.org
Last modified on July 29, 2020, 5:43 pm
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