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Equalization

The alteration of sound frequencies for a specific purpose, such as to remove 'noise' frequencies or to improve speech clarity.

Equalization or equalisation is the process of adjusting the balance between frequency components within an electronic signal. The most well known use of equalization is in sound recording and reproduction but there are many other applications in electronics and telecommunications. The circuit or equipment used to achieve equalization is called an equalizer. These devices strengthen (boost) or weaken (cut) the energy of specific frequency bands or "frequency ranges".

In sound recording and reproduction, equalization is the process commonly used to alter the frequency response of an audio system using linear filters. Most hi-fi equipment uses relatively simple filters to make bass and treble adjustments. Graphic and parametric equalizers have much more flexibility in tailoring the frequency content of an audio signal. Since equalizers "adjust the amplitude of audio signals at particular frequencies," they are, "in other words, frequency-specific volume knobs.":73

In the field of audio electronics, the term "equalization" (or "EQ") has come to include the adjustment of frequency responses for practical or aesthetic reasons, often resulting in a net response that is not actually "flat". The term EQ specifically refers to this variant of the term. Stereos and basic guitar amplifiers typically have adjustable equalizers which boost or cut bass or treble frequencies. Mid- to high-priced guitar and bass amplifiers usually have more bands of frequency control, such as bass, mid-range and treble or bass, low-mid, high-mid, and treble. Some amps have an additional knob for controlling very high frequencies. Broadcast and recording studios use sophisticated equalizers capable of much more detailed adjustments, such as eliminating unwanted sounds or making certain instruments or voices more prominent.

Equalizers are used in recording studios, radio studios and production control rooms, and live sound reinforcement and in instrument amplifiers, such as guitar amplifiers, to correct or adjust the response of microphones, instrument pick-ups, loudspeakers, and hall acoustics. Equalization may also be used to eliminate or reduce unwanted sounds (e.g., low hum coming from a guitar amplifier), make certain instruments or voices more (or less) prominent, enhance particular aspects of an instrument's tone, or combat feedback (howling) in a public address system. Equalizers are also used in music production to adjust the timbre of individual instruments and voices by adjusting their frequency content and to fit individual instruments within the overall frequency spectrum of the mix.:73–74

The most common equalizers in music production are parametric, semi-parametric, graphic, peak, and program equalizers.:74 Graphic equalizers are often included in consumer audio equipment and software which plays music on home computers. Parametric equalizers require more expertise than graphic equalizers, and they can provide more specific compensation or alteration around a chosen frequency. This may be used in order to remove unwanted resonances or boost certain frequencies. For example, an acoustic guitarist who finds that her instrument sounds too "boomy" may ask the audio engineer to cut the low frequencies to correct this issue; or a guitarist who finds that the amplified instrument sound has too much finger noise may ask the engineer to reduce the high frequencies.

Key Terms

dialogue
filmmaking
location
microphone
position
presence
room
room tone
silence
television production

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Acronymn

EQ

Synonymns

Equalization
(none found)

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Sources & Credits

Last modified on June 18 2019
Content adapted from Wikipedia
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