Fast cutting

A film editing technique that refers to several consecutive shots of a brief duration (e.g. 3 seconds or less).

Fast cutting is a film editing technique that refers to several consecutive shots of a brief duration (e.g. 3 seconds or less). It can be used to convey a lot of information very quickly or to imply either energy or chaos. Fast cutting is also frequently used when shooting dialogue between two or more characters, changing the viewer's perspective to either focus on the reaction of another character's dialog, or to bring to attention the non-verbal actions of the speaking character.

One famous example of fast cutting is the shower scene in Alfred Hitchcock's film Psycho (1960).

More recent examples include the can-can scene in Baz Luhrmann's Moulin Rouge! (2001).

The film Mind Game makes extensive use of fast cutting to convey hundreds of short scenes in the space of fifteen minutes.

In Run Lola Run fast cutting is used to quickly tell stories about minor characters to show how the casual actions of the protagonists have a profound impact on what happens to them.

In various moments in the Saw movies, fast cutting is used frequently during trap scenes, which represent their frantic struggle to escape the trap.

Director Michael Bay makes extensive use of fast-cutting in many of his feature films. He uses the technique most prominently during action sequences, in which it is used to make the action more energetic and intense.

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Adapted from content published on wikipedia.org
Last modified on May 9, 2020, 2:12 pm
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