Joint frequency encoding

An audio encoding technique designed to reduce the data rate by merging the frequency ranges of multiple sound channels.

Joint frequency encoding is an audio encoding technique designed to reduce the data rate.

The idea is to merge a given frequency range of multiple sound channels so that the resulting encoding will preserve the sound information of that range not as a bundle of separate channels but as one homogeneous data stream. This will destroy the original channel separation permanently, as the information cannot be accurately reconstructed, but will greatly lessen the amount of required storage space. Only some forms of joint stereo use the joint frequency encoding technique, such as intensity stereo coding.
Implementations

When used within the MP3 compression process, joint stereo normally employs multiple techniques and can switch between them for each MPEG frame. Typically, a modern encoder's joint stereo mode uses M/S stereo for some frames and L/R stereo for others, whichever method yields the best result. Encoders use different algorithms to determine when to switch and how much space to allocate to each channel; the quality can suffer if the switching is too frequent or if the side channel doesn't get enough bits. With some encoding software, it is possible to force the use of M/S stereo for all frames, mimicking the joint stereo mode of some early encoders like Xing. Within the LAME encoder, this is known as forced joint stereo.

As with MP3, Ogg Vorbis stereo files can employ either L/R stereo or joint stereo. When using joint stereo, both M/S stereo and intensity stereo methods may be used. As opposed to MP3 where M/S stereo (when used) is applied before quantization, an Ogg Vorbis encoder applies M/S stereo to samples in the frequency domain after quantization, making the application of M/S stereo a lossless step. After this step, any frequency area can be converted to intensity stereo by removing the corresponding part of the M/S signal's side channel. Ogg Vorbis' floor function will take care of the required left-right panning.

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Adapted from content published on wikipedia.org
Last modified on May 27, 2021, 9:04 am
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