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SCART

An audio/video connector used in consumer equipment, especially in Europe.
Scart Connector Pinout Color

SCART (also known as Péritel or Peritelevision, especially in France, 21-pin EuroSCART in marketing by Sharp in Asia, Euroconector in Spain, EuroAV or EXT, or EIA Multiport in the United States, as an EIA interface) is a French-originated standard and associated 21-pin connector for connecting audio-visual (AV) equipment. The name SCART comes from Syndicat des Constructeurs d'Appareils Radiorécepteurs et Téléviseurs, "Radio and Television Receiver Manufacturers' Association", the French organisation that created the connector in 1970. The related European standard EN 50049 has been then refined and published in 1978 by CENELEC, calling it peritelevision, but it is commonly called by the abbreviation péritel in French.

The signals carried by SCART include both composite and RGB (with composite synchronization) video, stereo audio input/output and digital signaling. The standard was extended at the end of the 1980s to support the new S-Video signals. A TV can be awakened from standby mode, and it can automatically switch to appropriate AV channel when the device attached to it through a SCART connector is turned on. SCART connection was also used for high definition signals like 720i, 720p, 1080i, 1080p with YPbPr connection by some manufacturers, but to the present day, this connection is very scarce due to the advent of HDMI.

In Europe, SCART was the most common method of connecting AV equipment, and was a standard connector for such devices; it was far less common elsewhere.

The official standard for SCART is CENELEC document number EN 50049-1. SCART is sometimes referred to as the IEC 933-1 standard.

History

Before SCART was introduced, TVs did not offer a standardized way of inputting signals other than RF antenna connectors, and these differed between countries. Assuming other connectors even existed, devices made by various companies could have different and incompatible standards. For example, a domestic VCR could output a composite video signal through a German-originated DIN-style connector, an American-originated RCA connector, an SO239 connector or a BNC connector.

The SCART connector first appeared on TVs in 1977. It became compulsory on new TVs sold in France from January 1980, and since 1989/1990 in eastern Europe, such as Poland. The actual French legal decree was adopted on 7 February 1980 and revoked on 3 July 2015.

The standard was subject to several amendments and at least 2 major revisions, approved by CENELEC on 13 November 1988 (EN 50049-1:1989) and 1 July 1997 (EN 50049-1:1997).

Features

The SCART system was intended to simplify connecting AV equipment (including TVs, VCRs, DVD players and games consoles). To achieve this it gathered all of the analog signal connections into a single cable with a unique connector that made incorrect connections nearly impossible.

The signals carried by SCART include both composite and RGB (with composite synchronization) video, stereo audio input/output and digital signaling. The standard was extended at the end of the 1980s to support the new S-Video signals. A TV can be awakened from standby mode, and it can automatically switch to appropriate AV channel when the device attached to it through a SCART connector is turned on. SCART connection was also used for high definition signals like 720i, 720p, 1080i, 1080p with YPbPr connection by some manufacturers, but to the present day, this connection is very scarce due to the advent of HDMI.

Key Terms

cenelec
composite synchronization
connector
peritelevision
rgb
scart
scart connector
signals
standard
tvs

Additional Resources

No ressources found.

Acronymn

(none found)

Synonymns

SCART
EIA Multiport
EuroAV
Euroconector
Péritel

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