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Vertical Sync

Synchronizing pulses used to define the end of one television field and the start of the next, occurring at a rate of approximately 59.94 Hz.

Vertical synchronization (also called vertical sync or VSync) separates the video fields. In PAL and NTSC, the vertical sync pulse occurs within the vertical blanking interval. The vertical sync pulses are made by prolonging the length of HSYNC pulses through almost the entire length of the scan line.

The vertical sync signal is a series of much longer pulses, indicating the start of a new field. The sync pulses occupy the whole of the line interval of a number of lines at the beginning and end of a scan; no picture information is transmitted during vertical retrace. The pulse sequence is designed to allow horizontal sync to continue during vertical retrace; it also indicates whether each field represents even or odd lines in interlaced systems (depending on whether it begins at the start of a horizontal line, or midway through).

The format of such a signal in 525-line NTSC is:

  • pre-equalizing pulses (6 to start scanning odd lines, 5 to start scanning even lines)
  • long-sync pulses (5 pulses)
  • post-equalizing pulses (5 to start scanning odd lines, 4 to start scanning even lines)

Each pre- or post- equalizing pulse consists of half a scan line of black signal: 2 µs at 0 V, followed by 30 µs at 0.3 V.

Each long sync pulse consists of an equalizing pulse with timings inverted: 30 µs at 0 V, followed by 2 µs at 0.3 V.

In video production and computer graphics, changes to the image are often kept in step with the vertical synchronization pulse to avoid visible discontinuity of the image. Since the frame buffer of a computer graphics display imitates the dynamics of a cathode-ray display, if it is updated with a new image while the image is being transmitted to the display, the display shows a mishmash of both frames, producing a page tearing artifact partway down the image.

Vertical synchronization eliminates this by timing frame buffer fills to coincide with the vertical blanking interval, thus ensuring that only whole frames are seen on-screen. Software such as video games and computer-aided design (CAD) packages often allow vertical synchronization as an option, because it delays the image update until the vertical blanking interval. This produces a small penalty in latency because the program has to wait until the video controller has finished transmitting the image to the display before continuing. Triple buffering reduces this latency significantly.

Two-timing intervals are defined – the front porch between the end of displayed video and the start of the sync pulse, and the back porch after the sync pulse and before the displayed video. These and the sync pulse itself are called the horizontal blanking (or retrace) interval and represent the time that the electron beam in the CRT is returning to the start of the next display line.

Key Terms

display
image
lines
odd lines
pulses
start
sync pulse
vertical blanking interval
vertical retrace
vertical synchronization

Additional Resources

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Acronymn

VSync

Synonymns

Vertical Sync
(none found)

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Sources & Credits

Last modified on October 4 2019
Content adapted from Wikipedia
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